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Radio blackout map

Solar winds

Aurora Forecast

planetary K Index

Now origin files come from SDO AIA satellite fleet.

"This channel is especially good at showing areas where cooler dense plumes of plasma (filaments and prominences) are located above the visible surface of the Sun. Many of these features either can't be seen or appear as dark lines in the other channels. The bright areas show places where the plasma has a high density."

"This channel (as well as AIA 131) is designed to study solar flares. It measures extremely hot temperatures around 6 million Kelvin (10.8 million F). It can take images every 2 seconds(instead of 10) in a reduced field of view in order to look at flares in more detail."

"This channel (as well as AIA 094) is designed to study solar flares. It measures extremely hot temperatures around 10 million K (18 million F), as well as cool plasmas around 400,000 K (720,000 F). It can take images every 2 seconds (instead of 10) in a reduced field of view in order to look at flares in more detail."

"This channel is especially good at showing coronal loops - the arcs extending off of the Sun where plasma moves along magnetic field lines. The brightest spots seen here are locations where the magnetic field near the surface is exceptionally strong."

"This channel highlights the outer atmosphere of the Sun - called the corona - as well as hot flare plasma. Hot active regions, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections will appear bright here. The dark areas - called coronal holes - are places where very little radiation is emitted, yet are the main source of solar wind particles."

"This channel (as well as AIA 335) highlights the active region of the outer atmosphere of the Sun - the corona. Active regions, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections will appear bright here. The dark areas - called coronal holes - are places where very little radiation is emitted, yet are the main source of solar wind particles."

"This channel (as well as AIA 211) highlights the active region of the outer atmosphere of the Sun - the corona. Active regions, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections will appear bright here. The dark areas - or coronal holes - are places where very little radiation is emitted, yet are the main source of solar wind particles."

"This channel (as well as AIA 1700) often shows a web-like pattern of bright areas that highlight places where bundles of magnetic fields lines are concentrated. However, small areas with a lot of field lines will appear black, usually near sunspots and active regions."

"This channel (as well as AIA 1600) often shows a web-like pattern of bright areas that highlight places where bundles of magnetic fields lines are concentrated. However, small areas with a lot of field lines will appear black, usually near sunspots and active regions."

"This image combines three images with different, but very similar, temperatures. The colors are assigned differently than in the single images. Here AIA 211 is red, AIA 193 is green, and AIA 171 is blue. Each highlights a different part of the corona."

"This image combines three images with different temperatures. Each image is assigned a color, and they are not the same used in the single images. Here AIA 094 is red, AIA 335 is green, and AIA 193 is blue. Each highlights a different part of the corona."

"This image combines three images with quite different temperatures. The colors are assigned differently than in the single images. Here AIA 304 is red (showing the chromosphere), AIA 211 is green (corona), and AIA 171 is dark blue (corona)."

Data source :: GOES-15
Data source :: STEREO

"STEREO consists of two space-based observatories - one ahead of Earth in its orbit, the other trailing behind. With this new pair of viewpoints, scientists will be able to see the structure and evolution of solar storms as they blast from the Sun and move out through space. This view is also great for tracking active regions on the farside of the sun."

"This coronagraph image was captured by the STEREO Ahead Spacecraft. A coronagraph is an instrument which studies the Sun's outer atmosphere. To make viewing easier, an artificial esclipse is created by using what is known as an occulting disk. This blocks the bright solar glare, thus allowing detailed viewing possible. This image is great for viewing ejected plasma, also known as coronal mass ejections."

Data source :: LASCO

"This image was captured using the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) instrument on board the GOES spacecraft. A coronagraph studies the Sun's outer atmosphere. To make viewing easier, an esclipse is created by using what is known as an occulting disk. This blocks the bright glare, thus making detailed viewing possible. This is great for detecting coronal mass ejections. "

Data source :: SOLARHAM

"The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) is an instrument designed to study oscillations and the magnetic field at the solar surface, or photosphere. HMI observes the full solar disk at 6173 angstroms with a resolution of 1 arcsecond. This wavelength is great for viewing visible sunspot formations."

"This image was captured by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), another instrument on SDO. It shows the magnetic field directions near the surface of the Sun. White and black areas indicate opposite magnetic polarities, with white showing north (outward) polarity and black showing south (inward) polarity."

"This image combines two different AIA channels. Both the 131 and 171 angstrom channels are shown."

"This channel is especially good at showing areas where cooler dense plumes of plasma (filaments and prominences) are located above the visible surface of the Sun. Many of these features either can't be seen or appear as dark lines in the other channels. The bright areas show places where the plasma has a high density."

"This channel (as well as AIA 335) highlights the active region of the outer atmosphere of the Sun - the corona. Active regions, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections will appear bright here. The dark areas - called coronal holes - are places where very little radiation is emitted, yet are the main source of solar wind particles."

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